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Mongabay —
May 11, 2018

John C. Cannon

The government of Tanzania is casting aside Maasai communities to make way for lucrative high-end safari tourism and hunting, says the Oakland Institute, a policy think tank, in a report published May 10.

Time —
May 10, 2018

By RODNEY MUHUMUZA / AP

(KAMPALA, Uganda) — Tens of thousands of Tanzania’s ethnic Maasai people are homeless after the government burned their houses to keep the savannah open for tourism benefiting two foreign safari companies, a U.S.-based policy think tank charged Thursday.

The Guardian —
May 10, 2018

Jonathan Watts - Global environment correspondent

Tanzanian government accused of putting indigenous people at risk in order to grant foreign tourists access to Serengeti wildlife

The Tanzanian government is putting foreign safari companies ahead of Maasai herding communities as environmental tensions grow on the fringes of the Serengeti national park, according to a new investigation.

Le Monde —
May 10, 2018

Marion Douet

Un rapport du Oakland Institute dénonce des intimidations envers les éleveurs qui pâtissent de conflits fonciers et doivent céder la place aux touristes et aux chasseurs.

La région du Serengeti, au nord de la Tanzanie, est mondialement connue pour la richesse de sa faune sauvage, qui attire chaque année des milliers de touristes et de chasseurs. Cette terre est également, depuis toujours, celle des Masai, non moins célèbres éleveurs semi-nomades qui vivent entre le Kenya et la Tanzanie.

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  • Quartz

    Abdi Latif Dahir

    Government officials and foreign companies in Tanzania are using ecotourism and conservation laws to displace indigenous Maasai people, evicting them and denying them access to watering holes and vital grazing for their livestock.

  • The Sydney Morning Herald

    By Rodney Muhumuza

    Kampala, Uganda: Tens of thousands of Tanzania's ethnic Maasai people are homeless after the government burnt their houses to keep the savannah open for tourism benefiting two foreign safari companies, a US-based policy think-tank claims.

    Villagers in northern Tanzania's Loliondo area, near the Ngorongoro Crater...

  • The Times

    Jane Flanagan

    Tens of thousands of Masai herders have been evicted and burnt out of their ancestral land in Tanzania to make way for exclusive safari tours, according to the findings of an investigation into environmental tensions in the region.

    The east African nation’s government has been prioritising the interests of foreign...

  • Yale Environment 360

    Maasai herding communities are being pushed off their ancestral land by the Tanzanian government and safari companies in favor of more lucrative tourism and hunting, according to a new report by the Oakland Institute, a California-based think tank...

  • Mongabay

    John C. Cannon

    The government of Tanzania is casting aside Maasai communities to make way for lucrative high-end safari tourism and hunting, says the Oakland Institute, a policy think tank, in a report published May 10.

  • The Washington Post

    By Rodney Muhumuza | AP

    KAMPALA, Uganda—Tens of thousands of Tanzania’s ethnic Maasai people are homeless after the government burned their houses to keep the savannah open for tourism benefiting two foreign safari companies, a U.S.-based group charged Thursday.

    Villagers in northern Tanzania’s Loliondo area, near the Ngorongoro...

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