Featured Media

June 8, 2011
Guardian UK--Institutions including Harvard and Vanderbilt reportedly use hedge funds to buy land in deals that may force farmers out.
June 8, 2011
Reuters--Wealthy U.S. and European investors are accumulating large swaths of African agricultural lands in deals that have little accountability and give them greater control over food supply for the world's poor, according to a report released Wednesday.
April 12, 2014
Experts and government officials from around the world have gathered at the World Bank in Washington, DC to chart a course to help lift the billion people who live on less than $1.25 a day out of extreme poverty within 15 years. 
April 3, 2014
Free market reforms are often heralded as helping to bring about prosperity, raise living standards and speed up development. The World Bank is the one of the biggest supporters of opening up or liberalizing economies with a system of rankings called the Doing Business index. But are the World Bank's reforms really about doing business? Not according to a new campaign led by the Oakland Institute think-tank.
April 1, 2014
On Monday, the Oakland Institute and /The Rules, along with other NGOs, farmer and consumer organizations from around the worldlaunched a campaign to hold the World Bank accountable for its role in the rampant theft of land and resources from some of the world’s poorest people – farmers, pastoralists and indigenous communities, many of whom are essential food producers for the entire planet.
April 1, 2014
Two reports contend that developed country money is being used to encourage the take-over or virtual theft of African land by outsider companies and investment groups.
April 5, 2014
One of the problems with neoliberal economic policy is that it's tough to get countries to agree to it; especially democratic ones. It has often required quite extreme measures, such as invasion - the classic example being the US-backed coup against Chile's democratically elected president - or debt bondage and structural adjustment led by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Both are effective ways of forcing countries to deregulate their markets.
April 3, 2014
One of the problems with neoliberal economic policy is that it’s tough to get countries to agree to it; especially democratic ones. It has often required quite extreme measures, such as invasion — the classic example being the US-backed coup against Chile’s democratically elected president — or debt bondage and structural adjustment led by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Both are effective ways of forcing countries to deregulate their markets.

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