Land Rights

Rights Denied: New Evidence Ties World Bank To Human Rights Abuses In Ethiopia

The soldiers pointed their guns at Odoge Otiri and led the 22-year-old student into the forest outside his village in western Ethiopia. Then, he says, they began pounding him with their nightsticks, leaving him bloody and unmoving.

“I was unconscious,” he recalls. “The reason they left me is they thought I was going to die.”

That night, soldiers arrested his wife, Aduma Omot.

“The soldiers took me to their camp,” she says. “Then they mistreated me, they raped me.”

They held her for two days, she says, before they let her go.

Ethiopians ‘Tortured, Oppressed and Silenced’ Into Surrendering Land to Foreign Investors

A first person testimony published Tuesday tallies the human cost of Ethiopia’s “villagization” program, in which tens of thousands of people have been forced from their ancestral homes to make way for large scale commercial agriculture.

The findings were reported by the California-based Oakland Institute in a study titled, “We Say the Land Is Not Yours: Breaking the Silence Against Forced Displacement in Ethiopia.”

Foreign Investment Driving Ethiopians off Ancestral Lands

The Ethiopian government is driving communities from their homes to make way for commercial agricultural projects to benefit foreign investors.

Ethiopian villagers, who refused to leave their ancestral homes to make way for large scale commercial agriculture, were “forced with gunshots” by the government, a damning first-person account has revealed.

The World Bank's race to the bottom

by Jeff Furman

For 13 years, the World Bank’s landmark publication, Doing Business, has ranked countries around the world based on how well their regulatory systems serve corporate interests. But far from merely analyzing the business climate across the globe, the annual report has profoundly affected the way that countries deal with regulation.

Foreign Investment Driving Ethiopians off Ancestral Lands

The Ethiopian government is driving communities from their homes to make way for commerical agricultural projects to benefit foreign investors.

Ethiopian villagers, who refused to leave their ancestral homes to make way for large scale commercial agriculture, were “forced with gunshots” by the government, a damning first-person account has revealed.

Civil Society Denounces World Bank’s ‘deceitful’ Conference on Land & Poverty

For the last fifteen years, the World Bank has been organizing “Conferences on Land and Poverty,” that bring together corporations, governments and civil society groups. The conferences have the objectives to discuss how to “improve land governance.”

The 16th conference, which will take place in Washington D.C. from March 23 to 27 has been taunted by hundreds of civil society organizations that are denouncing the World Bank’s role in global land grabs and its deceitful leadership on land issues.

When Ethiopia `villagizes’, women suffer

The Oakland Institute released a major report today, We Say the Land is Not Yours: Breaking the Silence against Forced Displacement in Ethiopia. The report is comprised of oral testimony of individuals who have been violently displaced by the Ethiopian government’s ongoing villagization program. The Ethiopian government says it hopes to `resettle’ as many as 1.5 million people, all in the name of development … and direct foreign investment.

Ethiopians talk of violent intimidation as their land is earmarked for foreign investors

The human cost of Ethiopia’s “villagisation” programme is laid bare by damning first person testimony published on Tuesday.

The east African country has long faced criticism for forcibly relocating tens of thousands of people from their ancestral homes to make way for large scale commercial agriculture, often benefiting foreign investors. Those moved to purpose-built communes are allegedly no longer able to farm or access education, healthcare and other basic services.

New Name, Same Game: World Bank's Enabling the Business of Agriculture

In March 2014, the multicontinental campaign Our Land Our Business was launched to demand the end of the World Bank’s Doing Business project and Benchmarking the Business of Agriculture (BBA) initiative, recently renamed Enabling the Business of Agriculture (EBA). Bringing together over 260 NGOs, farmer groups, grassroots organizations, and trade unions, Our Land Our Business condemned the World Bank business indicators, which rank countries on their investment climate for pushing a one-size-fits- all model and facilitating large-scale land grabs in developing countries.

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