Land Rights

Hedge funds 'grabbing land' in Africa

BBC--Hedge funds are behind "land grabs" in Africa to boost their profits in the food and biofuel sectors, a US think-tank says.

US universities in Africa 'land grab'

Guardian UK--Institutions including Harvard and Vanderbilt reportedly use hedge funds to buy land in deals that may force farmers out.

Investor land deals exploiting Africa, report alleges

Reuters--Wealthy U.S. and European investors are accumulating large swaths of African agricultural lands in deals that have little accountability and give them greater control over food supply for the world's poor, according to a report released Wednesday.

Special Investigation Phase One: Understanding Land Investment Deals in Africa

Read more about the Oakland Institute's ground-breaking research, which reveals previously unpublished details about land grabs across Africa.

Ethiopia's Anti-Terrorism Law stifles dissent

The 26th African Union Summit came to a close over the weekend. It was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Despite the fact that human rights were a major focus of the gathering, Ethiopia’s government is under heavy international scrutiny, accused of continued human rights and civil liberty abuses.

A think tank says Ethiopia’s anti-terrorism law is used to stifle dissent

The government of Ethiopia routinely uses its vague and overly broad anti-terrorism law to stifle freedom of expression and political opposition, the Oakland Institute, a policy think tank said in a report today.

“The flawed anti-terrorism law must be revised and its misuse by the government stopped,” the Institute recommended.

Ethiopia’s highly controversial anti-terrorism law, Proclamation No. 652/2009, 1 was enacted in 2009.

Ethiopia Must Stop Use of Anti-terror Law to Curtail Legitimate Political Debate and Dissent

Ethiopia must revise its controversial and flawed anti-terrorism proclamation and stop its routine application to stifle free expression and political dissent, the Oakland Institute and the Environmental Defender Law Center said in a new legal brief.

The refugee who took on the British government

Ben Rawlence

One day in late 2010, a farmer – I will call him Opik – woke up in his village in the remote Ethiopian province of Gambella. In this lush lowland area of savanna bordering South Sudan, the semi-nomadic Anuak people have lived for centuries, cultivating sorghum and maize, swimming in the river and gathering nuts, berries and fruits from the trees and wild honey from the forest. “It was paradise,” Opik recalled.

Ethiopia Drought Crisis: Pastoralists Threatened By El Niño, Land Grabbing, Population Growth Adopt Nontraditional Methods To Survive

Morgan Winsor

Born and raised in one of the earth’s hottest and driest spots, Ethiopian herdsman Hasen Hamed perpetually moves his cattle across the northeast Afar region using traditional methods to locate green grass and drinking water, just as his father did before him. In recent years, Hamed has walked for days, only to find parched grass in customary rangelands that his ancestors had relied on to keep their herds alive. Now Hamed, 31, has just nine animals, after six died from famine this past year.

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